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Autoversion

AutoversionAutoversion is a tool I created in Python to automatically increment the version of my applications each time I build them in Visual Studio. It's not limited to Visual Studio because it's just a command-line interface. The tool is currently written for Python 2.7, but I'll be updating it soon for Python 3.5.

To make use of Autoversion, just put autoversion.py where your IDE can run it. I've added configuration instructions for Visual Studio on the github page. This is also where you can keep up with the source and download:

https://github.com/xeekworx/autoversion

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SDL2 Guides (Prerequisite), Setting Up Visual Studio 2015

Setting up Visual Studio for SDL2Welcome to setting up Visual Studio 2015, a prerequisite of my SDL2 Guide series! In this guide you will learn how to create a new C/C++ Win32 Project and configure it to use SDL2. The prerequisites for this course include the following:
  • You must already have mastered most key concepts of C/C++. 
  • You have at least Microsoft Visual Studio 2012 Professional, Community or Better (I'm using 2015 Professional, but Community is free and nearly the same).
  • A delightful beverage.
 
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SDL2 Guides, Part 02: Loading & Rendering Images

SDL2 Guides: Part 2Welcome to part two of my SDL2 Guide series! In this guide you will learn how to load images and render them to the screen using the SDL2 library. The prerequisites for this course include the following:
  • You must already have mastered most key concepts of C/C++. 
  • You are already familiar with your development environment and platform.
  • You have already downloaded SDL2 and configured a blank project.
  • You have followed (if necessary) part one of these guides.
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SDL2 Guides, Part 01: Your first SDL2 application

SDL2 Guides: Part 1Welcome to part one of my SDL2 Guide series! In this guide you will learn how to write your first SDL2 application. In this application you will initialize SDL, create a window, create a renderer, accept keyboard input and draw to the screen. The prerequisites for this course include the following:
  • You must already have mastered most key concepts of C / C++.
  • You've followed the Visual Studio Setup Guide if you intend on using Visual Studio for these tutorials.
  • You are already familiar with your development environment and platform.
  • You have already downloaded SDL2 and configured a blank project.
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How to find if a process exists by it's executable filename

How do you find out if a process exists by its executable filename? Unfortunately there isn't a simple way to do this with Windows API. To accomplish this you will have to enumerate all of the processes using CreateToolhelp32Snapshot. You also may not see every process depending on what user you're running as. For most, this gets the job done. Feel free to use this and change it to fit your needs.

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Subcategories

  • C / C++

    C++ is usually my choice language. If I'm writing a reusable API or low level tool it's going to be in C++. I'm not a heavy STL or template user; though I do use many parts of SDL when I find it most useful. When I originally learned C++ it was ANSI C++ many years ago so my code my not often utilize the latest and greatest, but every once in awhile I give in to my old ways and use something new. That means that sometimes my code is only going to be compatible with C++11, but most of the time it's not. I'm a simplistic person and I prefer readability, especially when posting here.

    C is another language I enjoy. I especially like to use it when making the most basic of command-line tools or teaching others how to do something. It's often easier to see what's going on in C than in C++ and that's just my opinion.

    Article Count:
    8
  • Python
    Article Count:
    1